Who is at fault if a driverless car has an accident?

Who is at fault if a driverless car has an accident? With technology companies like Google, Uber, Tesla and Intel working on driverless cars, and manufacturers like Nissan currently testing them on UK roads, it feels like it is now inevitable that sometime in the not-too-distant future our roads will be dominated by self-driving cars. A recent survey has also found that UK drivers are becoming more welcoming of driverless cars, but despite the ongoing work to develop the technology there is one question that still needs to be answered: who is at fault if a driverless car has an accident? A Google self-driving car in action One of the apparent advantages of self-driving cars is that they would be a ‘safer’ option, and so far the statistics bear that out. However, accidents will never be completely eradicated from our roads – and as if to prove that point one of Google’s driverless cars had an accident just last month. The accident happened in California, US, and involved the self-driving car pulling out in front of a bus that was travelling at 15mph. As a road traffic accident it is pretty unremarkable, but because it involved a self-driving car it does…

Owners of Liverpool care home criticised for rooms like ‘prison cells’ handed fine of over £80,000

Owners of Liverpool care home criticised for rooms like ‘prison cells’ handed fine of over £80,000 The owners of a care home in Liverpool that was deemed dangerous have been fined more than £80,000. Two brothers, Amjad and Amer Latif admitted a total of 14 offences following investigations by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) in 2015 which highlighted issues like residents were not being bathed and were being kept in rooms like ‘prison cells’. The CQC investigation led to a court order to close the Mossley Manor Care Home in Mossley Hill, which charged a minimum fee of £1,000 per month for its 43 permanent residents, after finding conditions to be, in the prosecutions words,  “depressing, unhygienic and unsafe.” The investigation was sparked after a woman called in the CQC after removing her mother from the care home just two hours after arriving due to the poor conditions. The inspectors found that there was no hot water at the care home, the toilets were dirty and there was a high risk of infections spreading. They also found that there was not enough staff on hand, a lack of suitably trained staff and some employees who were looking after vulnerable elderly…

Car dooring: Police propose adoption of ‘Dutch reach’ to help protect cyclists

Car dooring: Police propose adoption of ‘Dutch reach’ to help protect cyclists To make a personal injury compensation claim, contact CL Legal today on 0151 225 0197 or fill out our quick claim form. We work on a No Win No Fee basis to help you get the compensation you are entitled to. Police have called on UK motorists to adopt a new way of opening their car doors in order to reduce the amount of injured cyclists on our roads. The door opening method is called the ‘Dutch reach’ and involves drivers opening their door with their left hand – meaning they are forced to turn round completely and check their blind spots before opening the door. The same can apply for car passengers, who by opening their door with their right hand will ensure they fully check their blind spots for cyclists and other vulnerable road users before opening their door. The proposals are designed to reduce the instances of ‘car dooring’ cyclists – the term given when someone opens a car door directly into the path of a cyclist. Currently ‘car dooring’ is treated as a minor offence and carries a maximum fine of just £1,000. According…