New research finds link between heading footballs and brain injuries

New research finds link between heading footballs and brain injuries University College London scientists have called for ‘urgent’ research as study finds that years of heading footballs can lead to increased risk of dementia in later life. Researchers have found evidence linking the repeated heading of footballs to chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a condition know to cause dementia. The link was found after conducting post-mortem examinations on the brains of five professional footballers and one amateur player – all of whom had suffered from dementia and all had played football for an average of 26 years. The research findings is expected to strengthen the calls of many campaigners who want the Football Association (The FA) to put more resources and focus into the dangers of heading the ball. There is a clearly established duty of care when it comes to players injured during sporting activity. When participating in contact sports, a certain level of risk is to be expected, but if an inherent risk has been identified then a sports body/team/organisation¬†has a duty of care to take measures to minimise the risk. If this duty of care is neglected then they could be found liable for any treatment, rehabilitation or…

Heart surgeon in Leeds struck off for ‘serious shortcomings’

Heart surgeon in Leeds struck off for ‘serious shortcomings’ A children’s heart surgeon at Leeds General Infirmary has been struck off following “serious” and “long-standing shortcomings” in patient safety. After a review of paediatric car services and standards at Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, the surgeon Nihal Weerasena was referred to the General Medical Council. A tribunal then ruled that he was at fault for medical negligence failures involving six patients. The Trust had previously postponed children’s heart operations for a fortnight following safety concerns, and the Medical Practitioners Tribunal Service (MPTS) ruled that Mr Weerasena’s treatment of four out of the six patients – one adult and three children – was seriously below the standard reasonably expected of a competent surgeon. The treatment administered by Mr Weerasena included carrying out what the tribunal described as a “complex” surgical procedure on a seven-year-old which posed a “significant risk”. Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust should be commended for the way it has handled these incidents of clinical negligence. Unfortunately we see health complications and injuries occurring following hospital visits all too often – which tend to be as a direct result of health care providers not learning and taking action after…