APIL – proposed changes to small claims limits treats whiplash sufferers as an ‘inconvenience’

APIL – proposed changes to small claims limits treats whiplash sufferers as an ‘inconvenience’ Personal injury solicitors have launched a final attack on the government’s proposed plans to increase small claims limits following the recently completed consultation period. The Association of Personal Injury Lawyers (APIL) described the proposals as being based on a flawed premise which are supported by scant evidence and will do little to achieve the proposed aims of countering fraud within the claims process. APIL also claim that it is extremely doubtful that motor insurers will pass on any savings they make to consumers. APIL claim that the proposed removal of general damages for all minor road traffic accident-related soft tissue injuries is actually unlawful, and described the £25 payment for psychological harm as ‘derisory’. The outcome of increasing the personal injury small claims limit to £5,000 would therefore restrict access to justice and have no affect on the levels of fraud, according to APIL. President of APIL, Neil Sugarman, said: “It’s as if people with injuries should never have happened in the first place are just an inconvenience which can casually be brushed aside.” He also stated that the plans would force whiplash claimants to jump through…

Lawyers make final plea to Lord Chancellor ahead of whiplash reforms deadline

Lawyers make final plea to Lord Chancellor ahead of whiplash reforms deadline Personal injury solicitors and law firms have rallied round to urge the Lord Chancellor to rethink the proposed changes to small claims limits. The period to hear responses to the proposals ends on 6 January 2017, with the full announcement of the new legislation due in April. Ahead of the deadline this week, personal injury solicitors have called on the Lord Chancellor, Liz Truss, to rethink the controversial proposals. The changes proposed by the government will increase the ‘small claim limit’ from the current level of £1,000 to £5,000. This means that any claim with damages expected to be below the £5,000 will be heard in the small claims court, which does not allow the Claimant to reclaim their legal fees. Liz Truss, Secretary of State for Justice and Lord Chancellor The government says that this will save an average of £40 on every motor insurance policy, due to the amount of whiplash claims that are currently made, but personal injury solicitors across the UK have debunked this – with some even setting up a campaign to challenge the government’s position on whiplash claims. As the consultation deadline approaches, lawyers…