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Best cycling apps 2017

With new cycling smartphone apps constantly hitting the market, it can be difficult to work out which is the best on for you.

Whether you want an app that simply records your rides, monitors and organises your training or even keeps you up to date with the state of the roads in your area: there are plenty of cycling apps for you to choose from.

It’s fair to say the smartphone has revolutionised cycling, allowing cyclists to easily track and record their rides, plan their routes, organise their training routines and much more.

To help you keep track of them all, we’ve compiled a list of the best cycling apps below…

Strava

Strava logo

Starting with the obvious one first, Strava is still one of the most popular GPS cycling apps around.

It has grown significantly since it first launched in 2009, and now boasts a huge array of different ride-logging functions – keeping track of all your ride stats simply and reliably e.g. speed, time, distance, elevation, calories burned and so on.

Where Strava really stands out is in the ‘gamification’ side of things. It’s ‘segments’ shows riders’ times on leaderboards so you can see how you compare with other Strava users who have been on the same road. The built-in social functionality of Strava which allows users to follow the progress of friends, take part in challenges and join clubs is the biggest reason for its huge popularity.

CycleMaps

This app works by compiling all the best information and data from third party mapping sources, and then filtering it all to get to the important bits like providing speed and safety options for your cycling routes.

CycleMaps makes it easy to plan your route and to plot the most direct and safest option for you. You can also tailor you route, i.e. specify a slow or scenic ride or the quickest and most direct route.

It is also available as an online mapping tool so you can plan your journey well-ahead.

Cyclemeter

If you’re prepared to put your iPhone on your handlebars, then Cyclemeter is the app you need to turn your phone into a great cycling computer. It has an array of customisable features to use during your ride, as well as a host of post-ride analytical features.

Cyclemeter allows you to stop/start your ride tracking by simply using your iPhone earphone button, and it features seamless integration with Google Maps in case you get a bit lost.

You can also compete with your own previous times over the same course and configure your own audio alerts for time, distance, heart rate and more. Cyclemeter also lets you set up your own training program which can then sync with your calendar app of choice.

RiderState

riderstate cycling appAlthough Strava may boast a ‘gamification’ feature, RiderState takes things a bit further.

RiderState is a crowd-funded app interactive game that is played by cyclists who log their rides in a bid to ‘conquer’ territories in their area. The more cyclists ride in a certain area, the more blocks on the map they earn. RiderState tracks the routes in real-time on a map, with the idea being to turn your cycling around a town or city into a kind of boardgame you play against friends or strangers.

As well as the ‘boardgame’ angle, the app also keeps a track of all of your riding stats such as distance covered, average speed etc…

Bike Doctor

The Bike Doctor app

It’s not just tracking and route management apps available to cyclists these days. The Bike Doctor app is on hand to make the maintenance, servicing and repair of your bicycle as easy as possible.

The app provides easy to follow, step-by-step instructions to fix just about any mechanical problem you can think of – and it is designed to be easy to use and features clear instructions that beginners can follow.

Map My Ride

The Map My Ride app was one of the very first ride-logging and tracking apps, and despite a lot of competition from the likes of Strava it still has a lot to offer.

Map My Ride records a host of data about your cycling, including speed, distance, elevation etc… which can all be uploaded to their site for very detailed analysis and sharing.

Similarly to Strava, Map My Ride also features timed sections – called Courses rather than ‘Segments’ – where users can compete to set the fastest time.

The Sufferfest

This is the app for cyclists who are really serious about their training. The Sufferfest app is designed to push cyclists further than they ever even thought they could go when training indoors, boasting features to help users stay focused and motivated during training.

The Sufferfest app features videos overlaid with your training stats, giving you real-time data on your training and performance metrics. With licenses for big cycle races like Tour de France, Giro d’Italia and the World Championships, the videos provide all the motivation you need to push harder as you are suddenly involved in some of the biggest road races – having to follow attacks and cycle strategically.

Zwift

Another training app that works as an interactive game, Zwift allows riders all over the world to ride and race together.

Users can create a customised avatar that can be ridden around various courses, some built from the real-world like London to fantasy courses around Zwift Island.

Zwift is a great training tool, especially for the winter months when the weather can prevent you getting out on the road.

Fill That Hole

There’s nothing worse than hitting those bone-shaking potholes while out cycling on the road, but with the Fill That Hole app you can now report any pothole you come across.

The app was created by national cycling charity Cycling UK, and allows you to easily flag up the exact location of dangerous potholes which is then forwarded onto the relevant local authority/council. It even lets you take a photo of the pothole.

Read more…

Can cyclists make a claim if injured because of potholes?

Cycling injury claims: What to do after an accident

Is not wearing a helmet when cycling negligent?